Human-Computer Music Interaction 2017

The Turing Test Competition in Human-Computer Music Interaction comprises several performance tasks in instrumental music and dance. Competitors are asked to create artificial performers capable of performing “duets” with human performers in real time. An artificial performer passes this Turing test if human judges cannot distinguish the Human-Computer music interaction from Human-Human interaction. The winners of each task category, instrumental music and dance, will be awarded $2000 and will be invited to perform live at the 2017 Conference in Computational Creativity.

Task descriptions

The performance tasks are (1) classical music collaboration, (2) improvised music collaboration, (3) waltzing, and (4) street dance.
Each task contains a human part (to be performed by a human) and a computer part (to be performed by the submitted artificial performer). We explain below in detail the classical music collaboration. The other tasks are analogous (in a manner that we indicate below).

  1. AccompaniX – Classical and Improv
  2. AlgoRhythm: Dance
    In this case we mechanize the scenario in which two performers, who have been practicing for a while, arrive onstage for a new performance. They must now play the piece that they have practiced together. Though both performers “know” the music they will play, their performance will differ from others in that the accompanist needs to follow the leader anew. In this collaboration, one performer will be artificial.

Rules:

  1. Participants will be given 5 pieces of collaborative music in the form of (1) a score and (2) a human performance of the collaborative music. The latter will be in the form of MIDI and audio files or the participants are free to create their own human performance.
  2. Participants shall choose (at least) one of the five pieces. The “test” is then when given a new human version of the lead part of the collaboration, the machine (artificial performer) shall construct the collaborative computer part. Participants will have 24 hours to construct their artificial performers (or to “train” the artificial performers if any machine-learning techniques are involved) and to then produce a performance.
  3. The created artificial performer should be a program (written in C, Python, etc.) capable of sequentially processing the human part and generating a computer part. Note the program should be causal; during the course of a performance, artificial performers cannot use future human performance as a guide to generate their current performance.

    Submissions:

  4. Contest participants can choose to submit entries that derive from any one of the 5 pieces.
  5. Submissions comprise (1) the source code for the artificial performer, (2) recording(s) of the human performance(s), and (3) the generated computer part(s).
    Entries must be submitted via the competition Web site [TBA] by 11:59PM UTC, May 15, 2017. Submissions will be effected through access to a virtual machine running a Linux operating system. Participants will be responsible for getting their software to run on the platform (although the organizers will do their best to help if problems arise). Instructions for accessing the machine will be available on TBA.
  6. The virtual machine should be able to run the code and generate performances using less than 16GB of RAM and less than 50GB of disk space.
    The program must be completely self-contained and require no connectivity to the Internet.
    Entries will be tested and a set of finalists will be determined. Validation will take the form of giving the artificial new human performances to follow in the form of MIDI and audio input.
  7. Among the finalists, the best (as determined by a panel of judges) program that “passes” the Turing Test will receive a $2000 cash prize.
    Judges will give prizes for outstanding creative efforts at their discretion.

We anticipate that winners and other participants will be asked to engage with the 2017 International Conference on Computational Creativity, to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, June 19-June 23, 2017. Details will be announced at a later date.

Improvisational Collaboration – Jazz duet

In this case we operationalize the scenario in which performers have been practicing for a while and then they come out on to stage for a new performance and they must play the old piece together, so the accompanist has seen the music before and they play, presumably a performance that differs from others in that the accompanist needs to follow anew the leader. The only difference from classical duet is that the jazz human solo follows a lead sheet rather than a score.

Algorhythm – Classical and Improv

Classical Dance Collaboration – The Waltz

This is the classical duet. In this case we operationalize the scenario in which two performers have been practicing for a while and then they come out on to stage for a new performance and they must dance together once again, presumably a performance that differs from others in that the accompanist needs to follow anew the leader.

Rules:

  1. Participants will be given 5 pieces of “collaborative dance music” - all waltzes - in the form of (1) a score and (2) audio in the form of MIDI and audio files or the participants are free to create their own human performance. The human dancer is given as motion vector and/or wireframe sequences that are synchronized with music.
  2. The “test” is then when given a new human version of the lead part of the collaboration, the machine will have 24 hours to construct the collaboration.

    Submissions:

  3. Contest participants can choose to submit entries that derive from any one of the 5 pieces.
  4. Submissions comprise (1) the source code for the artificial performer (3) Motion vector and/or wireframe sequences that are synchronized with music representing the artificial performer.
  5. Entries must be submitted via the competition Web site [TBA] by 11:59PM UTC, May 15, 2017. Contestants wills submit their work to a virtual machine running a Linux operating system. Participants will be responsible for getting their software to run on the platform (although the organizers will do their best to help if problems arise). Instructions for accessing the machine will be available on May 1, 2015.
  6. The virtual machine should be able to run the code and generate performances within 24 hours using less than 16GB of RAM and less than 50GB of disk space.
  7. The program must be completely self-contained and require no connectivity to the Internet.
  8. Entries will be tested and a set of finalists will be determined. Validation will take the form of giving the artificial performers new human performances to follow in the form of MIDI and audio input and motion vector and/or wireframe sequences that are synchronized with music.
  9. Among the finalists, any programs that “pass” the Turing Test will receive a $2000 cash prize.
  10. Judges will give prizes for outstanding creative efforts at their discretion.

We anticipate that winners and other participants will be asked to engage with the 2017 International Conference on Computational Creativity, to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, June 19-June 23, 2017. Details will be announced at a later date.

Improvisational Collaboration – Street Dance duet

In this case we operationalize a “street dance” duet – more of a free-form dance duet. Rules and considerations/specifications are analogous to the Waltz competition, with only a change in the kind of music (and thus, presumably, with the style of dance).